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Oklahoma restaurant owner experiments with cooking with cannabis – KOCO Oklahoma City

Jarros Friedel has his medical marijuana card and has been experimenting with recipes that go beyond the standard of gummies and brownies.One of the recipes the co-owner of Guyute’s in Oklahoma City has been working on is a chicken confit. He makes the oil at his house.”We grind up the cannabis. We put it in the oven at 220 for about an hour,” Friedel says in a video he sent to KOCO 5. “Once it’s decarbed, you set up a double boiler and heat it to about 140, put cannabis in oil in mason jar in a double boiler. Let it sit there. It becomes infused after about an hour, hour and a half. Strain oil.”And that wasn’t the only cannabis component to the chicken confit.”We made some verblanc sauce to put over the top of it with our infused cannabis butter,” Friedel said, “and the infused cannabis butter actually does have a smell to it.”KOCO 5’s Abigail Ogle: “I guess that just adds to the high, essentially?”Friedel: “Yes, absolutely. This is almost 200 milligrams per tablespoon, so it’s gonna put you out.”Friedel said the high amount of marijuana won’t really affect the taste or the smell of the chicken confit.Restaurant professionals aren’t the only ones getting creative in the cannabis kitchen. Lauri Dykstra started exploring marijuana recipes when she had stage 2 breast cancer.”Anything that you love to make, you can add a little bit of cannabis oil to it,” Dykstra said.People at a reputable dispensary will help customers buy what they need.”You just start out with a really low amount and see what you can tolerate,” Dykstra said.That aspect is key as experts said it can be harder to gauge how much marijuana you’re ingesting when you eat it compared to smoking it.”The critical thing is obviously getting the dosing correct, which is more difficult than it might seem,” Dr. Steven Ross said.How the cannabis is ingested also should be taken into consideration.Ogle: “Would you say that it’s more potent this way? To eat it rather than smoke it?”Friedel: “Absolutely. It’s very much more potent this way.”Ogle: “So what serving of this would be? One piece of chicken?”Friedel: “Yes, one piece of of chicken and some potatoes and asparagus and onions.”Ogle: “Would you be OK to drive after that?”Friedel: “Legally, I don’t believe so. It helps pain a lot. And nausea. And insomnia. Running a restaurant, being here until 4 to 5 in the morning, it really helps to ease your pain, helps you go to bed really easy.” It’s important to note that the restaurant owner KOCO 5 spoke to said they are not selling any dishes with marijuana, just experimenting with recipes in their kitchen.At this point, it would be illegal for a location to cook a cannabis dish and serve it to someone at a restaurant, even if the customer has their medical marijuana card.

Jarros Friedel has his medical marijuana card and has been experimenting with recipes that go beyond the standard of gummies and brownies.

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One of the recipes the co-owner of Guyute’s in Oklahoma City has been working on is a chicken confit. He makes the oil at his house.

“We grind up the cannabis. We put it in the oven at 220 for about an hour,” Friedel says in a video he sent to KOCO 5. “Once it’s decarbed, you set up a double boiler and heat it to about 140, put cannabis in oil in mason jar in a double boiler. Let it sit there. It becomes infused after about an hour, hour and a half. Strain oil.”

And that wasn’t the only cannabis component to the chicken confit.

“We made some verblanc sauce to put over the top of it with our infused cannabis butter,” Friedel said, “and the infused cannabis butter actually does have a smell to it.”

KOCO 5’s Abigail Ogle: “I guess that just adds to the high, essentially?”

Friedel: “Yes, absolutely. This is almost 200 milligrams per tablespoon, so it’s gonna put you out.”

Friedel said the high amount of marijuana won’t really affect the taste or the smell of the chicken confit.

Restaurant professionals aren’t the only ones getting creative in the cannabis kitchen. Lauri Dykstra started exploring marijuana recipes when she had stage 2 breast cancer.

“Anything that you love to make, you can add a little bit of cannabis oil to it,” Dykstra said.

People at a reputable dispensary will help customers buy what they need.

“You just start out with a really low amount and see what you can tolerate,” Dykstra said.

That aspect is key as experts said it can be harder to gauge how much marijuana you’re ingesting when you eat it compared to smoking it.

“The critical thing is obviously getting the dosing correct, which is more difficult than it might seem,” Dr. Steven Ross said.

How the cannabis is ingested also should be taken into consideration.

Ogle: “Would you say that it’s more potent this way? To eat it rather than smoke it?”

Friedel: “Absolutely. It’s very much more potent this way.”

Ogle: “So what serving of this would be? One piece of chicken?”

Friedel: “Yes, one piece of of chicken and some potatoes and asparagus and onions.”

Ogle: “Would you be OK to drive after that?”

Friedel: “Legally, I don’t believe so. It helps pain a lot. And nausea. And insomnia. Running a restaurant, being here until 4 to 5 in the morning, it really helps to ease your pain, helps you go to bed really easy.”

It’s important to note that the restaurant owner KOCO 5 spoke to said they are not selling any dishes with marijuana, just experimenting with recipes in their kitchen.

At this point, it would be illegal for a location to cook a cannabis dish and serve it to someone at a restaurant, even if the customer has their medical marijuana card.

Written by homegrownreview

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