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Why some Sacramento cannabis businesses may have to close – KCRA Sacramento

A long-coming deadline for some Sacramento cannabis companies was Friday.The city’s new pot czar is tasked with enforcing the rules and that could mean some cannabis companies could be forced to close.“We really want to be fair in our city and treat our businesses equally,” said Davina Smith, the Cannabis Program manager for the city of Sacramento.Fifty-eight companies need to get a business operating permit or temporarily close until the permitting process is complete.Those companies are part of a 2016 registry the city created prior to the legalization of recreational marijuana. Most of those companies cultivated medical marijuana. Here’s what you need to know:Why is there a registry?Before the legalization of recreational marijuana in California, medical marijuana companies were operating in Sacramento.In an effort to ensure patients would have continued access to marijuana, the city created the registry in 2016 to allow those companies to stay open while applying for a business operating permit.“It was sort of an agreement that we made,” Smith said. “Where it would allow you to keep operating and you would work towards getting into compliance.”What is a business operating permit (BOP)?It’s a permit issued by the Office of Cannabis Police and Enforcement that looks at the proposed cannabis commercial activity.City-issued permits are required to get a state license.The BOP ensures the company’s building and its facilities are safe.Why start enforcing now?Smith said businesses were sent several notices letting them know the deadline was coming. She said the need to start enforcing will level the playing field among cannabis companies.New companies — not on the 2016 registry — needed to have a business operating permit in hand before being allowed to open in the city.“It’s not fair for those people who have gone through that process, gotten all the licenses and permits they needed, gotten their business operating permits and then to have a neighbor who was maybe able to register in 2016 and they don’t have to do that,” Smith said.Are any dispensaries closing?Smith said no storefronts are closing. She said cultivation companies make up the largest group affected, followed by some manufacturers and a few distributors.Will the city shut down all the companies at once?The goal is to work with companies to get the needed permits.Smith said some companies are very close to finishing the process but will be asked to temporarily suspend operations until it’s completed.“We are going to ask that they stop operating,” Smith said. “We’re going to ask that they finish out as quickly as possible. The sad fact is that we’re going to have to shut people down because not everybody is going to voluntarily shut down.”

A long-coming deadline for some Sacramento cannabis companies was Friday.

The city’s new pot czar is tasked with enforcing the rules and that could mean some cannabis companies could be forced to close.

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“We really want to be fair in our city and treat our businesses equally,” said Davina Smith, the Cannabis Program manager for the city of Sacramento.

Fifty-eight companies need to get a business operating permit or temporarily close until the permitting process is complete.

Those companies are part of a 2016 registry the city created prior to the legalization of recreational marijuana. Most of those companies cultivated medical marijuana.

Here’s what you need to know:

Why is there a registry?

Before the legalization of recreational marijuana in California, medical marijuana companies were operating in Sacramento.

In an effort to ensure patients would have continued access to marijuana, the city created the registry in 2016 to allow those companies to stay open while applying for a business operating permit.

“It was sort of an agreement that we made,” Smith said. “Where it would allow you to keep operating and you would work towards getting into compliance.”

What is a business operating permit (BOP)?

It’s a permit issued by the Office of Cannabis Police and Enforcement that looks at the proposed cannabis commercial activity.

City-issued permits are required to get a state license.

The BOP ensures the company’s building and its facilities are safe.

Why start enforcing now?

Smith said businesses were sent several notices letting them know the deadline was coming. She said the need to start enforcing will level the playing field among cannabis companies.

New companies — not on the 2016 registry — needed to have a business operating permit in hand before being allowed to open in the city.

“It’s not fair for those people who have gone through that process, gotten all the licenses and permits they needed, gotten their business operating permits and then to have a neighbor who was maybe able to register in 2016 and they don’t have to do that,” Smith said.

Are any dispensaries closing?

Smith said no storefronts are closing.

She said cultivation companies make up the largest group affected, followed by some manufacturers and a few distributors.

Will the city shut down all the companies at once?

The goal is to work with companies to get the needed permits.

Smith said some companies are very close to finishing the process but will be asked to temporarily suspend operations until it’s completed.

“We are going to ask that they stop operating,” Smith said. “We’re going to ask that they finish out as quickly as possible. The sad fact is that we’re going to have to shut people down because not everybody is going to voluntarily shut down.”

Written by homegrownreview

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